Hosting the First Annual Fresh Minds Festival

Fresh Minds Festival PosterSeptember 26, 2013, featuring four international guest artists and live spatialization by students in a 10.2 channel 3D surround sound system, using a multitouch interface.

The Fresh Minds Festival is a public performance of audiovisual artworks by professional artists, student-curated under the direction of a multi-disciplinary team of faculty. Continue reading

Related posts:

Sound Design for Journey’s End

journey's endTexas A&M University hosted the  World War I conference, “1914 and the Making of the 20th Century” and as a part of it, the Theatre Arts program produced Journey’s End by R. C. Sheriff, directed by Anne Quackenbush. I directed some exciting developments in sound design for the show, which you can read about here: link.

Related posts:

Sonic Glimpses Art Installation

Created for the grand opening of our new building at TAMU, built by students, and covered in World Architecture magazine.

Sonic Glimpses is a site specific interactive art installation to celebrate the grand opening of the five-story Liberal Arts: Arts and Humanities building on the prestigious East Quad on the main campus of Texas A&M University in College Station, The building was designed by Brown Reynolds Watford Architects to meet the criteria of the Leadership in Engineering and Environmental Design (LEED) silver rating. The opening gala was held April 19, 2013, and the installation remained on display through July 15, 2013.

The art installation was designed to turn a trip up the grand staircase into an audio tour of the research and creative work being done in the building. Sound clips are triggered by traffic on the staircase, sounding near the location of each passerby. Faculty and students in the building contributed clips of their own creative work or the literature they study. Students in the Department of Performance Studies recorded the sound clips, performed some of the voice-acting work, installed the hardware, assisted in calibrating the software settings, and created the video documentation of the project. Creators Jeff Morris and Autum Casey worked with the building proctor, Environmental Health and Safety department, and the Audiovisual Surveillance Technology committee to ensure the installation satisfied concerns of all stakeholders.

The heart of the installation is a secure rack with Apple Mac Mini computer inside, along with multichannel audio interface, amplifier, and rack-mounted keyboard, trackpad, and video display. The computer runs a custom software program created by Jeff Morris in the Max graphic programming environment (by Cycling74). The rack is connected to two analog video cameras for control input (connected to digitizers inside the rack) and six bare speaker cones for audio output.

For aesthetic reasons and also to satisfy Environmental Health and Safety officials, especially since the grand staircase is the primary emergency exit route for most building occupants, we took efforts to keep the hardware minimally invasive. Most notably, we used only two video cameras for motion detection, mounted overhead, instead of sensors mounted on the stairs, such as pressure sensors, infrared tripwires, or infrared or ultrasonic proximity sensors.

The cameras provide vastly more data than such local sensors. This allowed for complex variations in the control data, resulting in the appearance that the artwork responds with a human-like whimsical character, with varying moods. The software turns cameras into motion detectors through frame differencing: calculating the absolute difference between each frame and the next, pixel by pixel, and summing the absolute difference of each pixel to yield a single number corresponding to motion. Since the staircase runs along a large windowed wall, natural light, changing throughout the day and affected by weather, influenced the artwork’s responsiveness over time, and differently so for each color. Further, the color contrasts and patterns of visitors’ clothing, skin, and hair and the ways in which they move each trigger the sounds in unique ways.

Designed by: Jeff Morris and Autum Casey

On the occasion of the Liberal Arts: Arts and Humanities building grand opening April 19, 2013 through July 15, 2013

Content contributors: Jayson Beaster-Jones, Michael Collins, Jeffrey Davis, Rayna Dexter, Mariana Gariazzo, Amy Guerin, Emily McManus’s Music in World Cultures class, Britt Mize, Rohan Sinha, Nancy Warren, Jennifer Wollock, Jaeeun Yi, Costume shop student workers

Content recorded by: Marco Pisterzi, Trent Tate, Casey Gilbert, Priscilla Lopez, Katharine Hinson Installed by Jeff Morris’s Intermedia Performance class and Autum Casey’s New Technology for Designers

Related posts:

Fostering a Culture of Creative Interdisciplinary Innovation at Texas A&M University

International Journal of Art, Culture and Design Technologies (IJACDT), vol. 2, no. 1. As a relatively young department in an aesthetically conservative, remote college town, the Department of Performance Studies at Texas A&M University is building a culture of innovation through strategic facility development, a focus on students sharing work through public performance, and a commitment to interdisciplinary collaboration. The authors have embraced the celebrated strengths of their university in STEM fields (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) by developing interdisciplinary experiences and inspiring facilities (through technology and curriculum grants). These experiences contribute to the university at large by demonstrating how technology can connect with the human element and how technology impacts human expression. The authors’ Music, Performance Studies, and Theatre Arts students benefit by joining the faculty in exploring the new and also rediscovering the traditional

Related posts:

Sound Design for Prelude to a Kiss

We had some fun with the sound design for the TAMU mainstage production of Prelude to a Kiss directed by Anne Quackenbush. In addition to using music from TAMU alumni band The Heart is a Lonely Hunter (some of which was recorded in our own studio), the music for the new age wedding ceremony is an algorithmic composition featuring Theatre Arts and Music student J.J. Ceniceros. We called the project Pomegranate Aspiration. Continue reading

Related posts:

PerfTech Presents: The TAMU Laptet and Friends with Guest Artist Ivica Ico Bukvic

PerfTech students presented new compositions for live electronics with a 3D surround sound system in TAMU’s Fallout Theatre. The concert featured a performance by the TAMU Laptet, TAMU’s freshman laptop ensemble, one by guest artist Ivica Ico Bukvic (Virginia Tech). Continue reading

Related posts:

Research Embodied: site-specific intermedia performance

Co-created with designer Autum CaseyResearch Embodied is an intermedia performance designed for the Great Hall of the Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library with musicians performing with amplified books and QWERTY keyboard, footsteps, and movement (in front of a camera-triggered synthesized carillon), along with two large video projections and five actors.

Acoustically, we highlight how the Great Hall amplifies presence in the space.  The reverberation preserves instants in time, mirroring the function of a library.  Visually, we merge the view of the archives with a glimpse of their contents.  Functionally, we scripted and made music form the activities of participants in the Great Hall and scholars in the stacks.  Conceptually, we call attention to the union and separation of the public and scholars and the challenges of moderated access to information.

Continue reading

Related posts:

Third Prize in the Music in Architecture International Symposium

Research Embodied, a site-specific intermedia performance and installation created for the Great Hall of the Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library and Museum (Austin, Texas) was awarded Third Prize in the Music in Architecture—Architecture in Music International Symposium It was one of five finalists chosen from 74 entries (6.8% acceptance rate), from among international and Ivy League competitors. And it was performed by our students!

Related posts: